Neuroprotective Properties and Therapeutic Potential of Bone Marrow–Derived Microglia in Alzheimer’s Disease

American Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease &Other Dementiasr, Volume 35, Issue , January-December 2020.
Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia, which is characterized by a progressive cognitive decline and senile plaques formed by amyloid β (Aβ). Microglia are the immune cells of the central nervous system (CNS). Studies have proposed 2 types of microglia, namely, the resident microglia and bone marrow–derived microglia (BMDM). Recent studies suggested that BMDM, not the resident microglia, can phagocytose Aβ, which has a great therapeutic potential in AD. Bone marrow–derived microglia can populate the CNS in an efficient manner and their functions can be regulated by some genes. Thus, methods that increase their recruitment and phagocytosis could be used as a new tool that clears Aβ and ameliorates cognitive impairment. Herein, we review the neuroprotective functions of BMDM and their therapeutic potential in AD.Neuroprotective Properties and Therapeutic Potential of Bone Marrow–Derived Microglia in Alzheimer’s DiseaseNeuroprotective Properties and Therapeutic Potential of Bone Marrow–Derived Microglia in Alzheimer’s DiseaseAlzheimers{$excerpt:n}