Whole-Blood Levels of MicroRNA-9 Are Decreased in Patients With Late-Onset Alzheimer Disease

American Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease &Other Dementiasr, Volume 35, Issue , January-December 2020.
Recent evidence suggests changes in circulating microRNA levels may be promising biomarkers for the clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer disease (AD). We hypothesized that whole-blood microRNAs may be useful to identify individuals with established AD. For this purpose, a sample of community-dwelling women (≥55 years old) carrying the ApoE ∊4 allele were clinically evaluated using the American Psychiatric Association/Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth edition and the Alzheimer Disease Assessment Scale–Cognitive Subscale criteria to diagnose probable AD, and the Clinical Dementia Rating scale to stage the dementia. A set of 25 mature microRNAs was rationally selected for evaluation based on experimental evidence of interaction with genes linked to the late-onset AD neuropathology. Whole-blood concentrations were determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Compared to patients without dementia, a median 3-fold decrease in miR-9 levels was found among patients with AD (P = .001). Our findings support blood-borne miR-9 as a candidate biomarker for probable AD, embodied by evidence from the literature of its implication in amyloidogenesis.Whole-Blood Levels of MicroRNA-9 Are Decreased in Patients With Late-Onset Alzheimer DiseaseWhole-Blood Levels of MicroRNA-9 Are Decreased in Patients With Late-Onset Alzheimer DiseaseAlzheimers{$excerpt:n}